Join project Timberdoodle! Collect important data on a bird species in need of conservation

Join project Timberdoodle!
What's a timberdoodle? Why, a woodcock of course!
Wait-what's a woodcock?

Woodcock are usually captured and banded at sunset after their breeding displays. Male and female American woodcock spring, RI  Photo credit: Steve Brenner

Woodcock are usually captured and banded at sunset after their breeding displays. Male and female American woodcock spring, RI Photo credit: Steve Brenner

American woodcock are shorebirds, but you'll actually find them in open fields or young forests! The males use these open fields as a stage where they dance for onlooking females. These displays occur at twilight, it's all very romantic, really. The Rhode Island populations of woodcock have been declining for years despite management efforts to boost bird numbers. In order to optimize our current conservation efforts, members of the Dr. Scott McWilliams lab study how woodcock choose their breeding habitats and how birds use these managed areas.

American woodcocks are extremely camouflaged, so viewing them during breeding displays is our best shot at detecting them. American woodcock in RI, spring  Photo credit: Steve Brenner

American woodcocks are extremely camouflaged, so viewing them during breeding displays is our best shot at detecting them. American woodcock in RI, spring Photo credit: Steve Brenner

You can help in these conservation efforts by looking for these special dances in the state of Rhode Island!

Become a citizen science and collect data to help researchers learn more about how many woodcock are in the area and where they are breeding.

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Find out more:
on the website, on Facebook, on Twitter
Project organizer: Erin Harrington is a Ph.D. student studying science communication and avian ecology at the University of Rhode Island

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About the author:
Kristen J. DeMoranville is a Ph.D. student researching the effects of diet and long-distance flight on a migratory songbird in Scott McWilliams lab at the University of Rhode Island