About the blog

Lunch break: Bird Research Northwest scientists take a break from monitoring Caspian tern and Double-crested cormorant populations and from estimating the amount of salmonids they eat to eat some lunch of their own.  Photo credit:  Michael E. Johns is a marine ecologist who brings his remote research experiences to your screen with stunning photos of animals in their natural habitats (in this case field biologists!). Checking out his website is a must  michaelejohns.com

Lunch break: Bird Research Northwest scientists take a break from monitoring Caspian tern and Double-crested cormorant populations and from estimating the amount of salmonids they eat to eat some lunch of their own.
Photo credit: Michael E. Johns is a marine ecologist who brings his remote research experiences to your screen with stunning photos of animals in their natural habitats (in this case field biologists!). Checking out his website is a must michaelejohns.com

 
 

Satisfy your curiosity…

This blog is for science enthusiasts to explore the behavioral and physiological tactics animals use to contend with their changing environments.

Find out answers to questions like how birds are able to hover while fishing or feeding their chicks, why songbirds switch from eating insects to fruits in the fall, and how New England frogs and snakes combat cold temperatures during the winter!

Environments are changing more unpredictably than ever, and some organisms are failing to match to and survive in their habitats. Our posts will highlight the things that we can do to help animals and ecosystems in need.

Find out what excites physiologists & ecologists about the world we live in. Us scientists don't have all of the answers! Join the conversation and get sciencey with us, suggest topics we should coverhelp with research, and let's investigate these flexible animals together.